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Cell Mol Neurobiol. 2017 Jul;37(5):941-947. doi: 10.1007/s10571-016-0414-8. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

Transplantation of Human Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improves Locomotor Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

Author information

1
Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genética, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, Trindade, Florianópolis, SC, 88040-900, Brazil.
2
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
3
Departamento de Farmacologia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, Trindade, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil.
4
Faculdade de Farmácia, Centro de Ciências Da Saúde, Universidade Federal Do Rio de Janeiro, Campus Universitário, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
5
Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genética, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, Trindade, Florianópolis, SC, 88040-900, Brazil. andrea.trentin@ufsc.br.

Abstract

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurologic disorder with significant impacts on quality of life, life expectancy, and economic burden. Although there are no fully restorative treatments yet available, several animal and small-scale clinical studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of cellular interventions for SCI. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-which are conventionally isolated from the bone marrow-recently emerged as promising candidates for treating SCI and have been shown to provide trophic support, ameliorate inflammatory responses, and reduce cell death following the mechanical trauma. Here we evaluated the human skin as an alternative source of adult MSCs suitable for autologous cell transplantation strategies for SCI. We showed that human skin-derived MSCs (hSD-MSCs) express a range of neural markers under standard culture conditions and are able to survive and respond to neurogenic stimulation in vitro. In addition, using histological analysis and behavioral assessment, we demonstrated as a proof-of-principle that hSD-MSC transplantation reduces the severity of tissue loss and facilitates locomotor recovery in a rat model of SCI. Altogether, the study provides further characterization of skin-derived MSC cultures and indicates that the human skin may represent an attractive source for cell-based therapies for SCI and other neurological disorders. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which hSD-MSCs elicit tissue repair and/or locomotor recovery.

KEYWORDS:

Cell transplantation; Human skin; Mesenchymal stem cells; Spinal cord injury

PMID:
27510317
DOI:
10.1007/s10571-016-0414-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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