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Mol Cells. 2016 Sep;39(9):645-53. doi: 10.14348/molcells.2016.0137. Epub 2016 Aug 9.

Brain Reward Circuits in Morphine Addiction.

Kim J1,2,3, Ham S1,2,4, Hong H5, Moon C3, Im HI1,2,4.

Author information

1
Center for Neuroscience, Brain Science Institute, Seoul 02792, Korea.
2
Convergence Research Center for Diagnosis, Treatment and Care System of Dementia, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 02792, Korea.
3
Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Medical Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea.
4
Department of Neuroscience, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 34113, Korea.
5
Department of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul 05029, Korea.

Abstract

Morphine is the most potent analgesic for chronic pain, but its clinical use has been limited by the opiate's innate tendency to produce tolerance, severe withdrawal symptoms and rewarding properties with a high risk of relapse. To understand the addictive properties of morphine, past studies have focused on relevant molecular and cellular changes in the brain, highlighting the functional roles of reward-related brain regions. Given the accumulated findings, a recent, emerging trend in morphine research is that of examining the dynamics of neuronal interactions in brain reward circuits under the influence of morphine action. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the roles of several reward circuits involved in morphine addiction based on pharmacological, molecular and physiological evidences.

KEYWORDS:

addiction; morphine; opiate; reward circuits; withdrawal symptom

PMID:
27506251
PMCID:
PMC5050528
DOI:
10.14348/molcells.2016.0137
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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