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Clin Cardiol. 2016 Sep;39(9):491-6. doi: 10.1002/clc.22577. Epub 2016 Aug 9.

Prevalence and Factors Associated With Statin Use Among a Nationally Representative Sample of US Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. dadedinsewo@msm.edu.
2
Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. dadedinsewo@msm.edu.
3
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
4
Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia.
5
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine, Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, Florida.

Abstract

The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommend statins for adults age ≤75 years who have clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (IA) and adults age 40 to 75 years with diabetes mellitus and LDL-C 70-189 mg/dl (IA). Our aim was to estimate the prevalence and likelihood of statin use among selected statin benefit groups. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2012, we examined 5319 adults age ≥20 years. We estimated weighted frequencies and prevalence of statin use for adults with diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia (or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥70 mg/dL), defined as statin benefit group 1 (SBG1); and for adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, defined as statin benefit group 2 (SBG2). We constructed a logistic regression model to estimate odds of statin use in SBG1. Overall, an estimated 38.6 million Americans are on a statin. In adjusted models, uninsured and Hispanic adults were less likely to be on a statin compared with white adults; 59.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 53.0-66.1) of all adults in SBG1, 58.8% (95% CI: 51.5-66.1) of adults age 40 to 75 in SBG1, and 63.5% (95% CI: 55.6-71.4) of all adults in SBG2 were on a statin. Although the prevalence of statin use has increased over time, Hispanic ethnicity and lack of insurance remain barriers to statin use. Black-white racial disparities were not significant. Our study provides a baseline estimate of statin use in the noninstitutionalized population just prior to introduction of the new guidelines and provides a reference for evaluating the impact of the new guidelines on statin utilization.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical; Epidemiology; Lipidology; Pharmacology; Preventive cardiology

PMID:
27505443
PMCID:
PMC5030167
DOI:
10.1002/clc.22577
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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