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BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016 Aug 8;16(1):158. doi: 10.1186/s12872-016-0337-9.

Association of affective temperaments with blood pressure and arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
2
1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College, London, UK.
4
1st Department of Pediatrics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
5
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
6
Department of Pharmacodynamics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. gonda.xenia@med.semmelweis-univ.hu.
7
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. gonda.xenia@med.semmelweis-univ.hu.
8
MTA-SE Neurochemistry Research Group, Budapest, Hungary. gonda.xenia@med.semmelweis-univ.hu.
9
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
10
Health Service of Zugló (ZESZ), Budapest, Hungary.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Affective temperaments (anxious, depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and hyperthymic) measure subclinical manifestations of major mood disorders. Furthermore, cumulating evidence suggests their involvement in somatic disorders as well. We aimed to assess associations between affective temperament scores and blood pressure and arterial stiffness parameters in hypertensive patients.

METHODS:

In this cross-sectional study, 173 patients with well-controlled or grade 1 chronic hypertension, with no history of depression, completed the TEMPS-A, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) questionnaires in three GP practices. Arterial stiffness was measured with tonometry (PulsePen).

RESULTS:

According to multiple linear regression analysis, cyclothymic temperament score was positively associated with brachial systolic blood pressure independently of age, sex, total cholesterol, brachial diastolic blood pressure, BDI, HAM-A and the use of alprazolam (β = 0.529, p = 0.042), while hyperthymic temperament score was negatively related to augmentation index independent of age, sex, smoking, heart rate, BDI, HAM-A and the use of alprazolam (β = -0.612, p = 0.013). A significant interaction was found between cyclothymic temperament score and sex in predicting brachial systolic blood pressure (p = 0.025), between irritable and anxious temperament scores and sex in predicting pulse wave velocity (p = 0.021, p = 0.023, respectively) and an interaction with borderline significance between hyperthymic temperament score and sex in predicting augmentation index (p = 0.052).

CONCLUSIONS:

The present findings highlight elevated blood pressure among subjects with high cyclothymic temperament as well as an increased level of arterial stiffening in subjects with low hyperthymic scores suggesting that affective temperaments may play a role in the development of hypertension and arterial stiffening and may thus represent markers of cardiovascular risk. Sex differences were also present in these associations.

KEYWORDS:

Affective temperament scores; Arterial stiffness; Augmentation index; Blood pressure; Hypertension

PMID:
27503108
PMCID:
PMC4977892
DOI:
10.1186/s12872-016-0337-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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