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J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2016 Sep;29(5):261-70. doi: 10.1177/0891988716654985.

Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Center for Alzheimer Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Geriatric Medicine, Memory Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden sara.garcia-ptacek@ki.se.
2
Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Center for Alzheimer Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Neurology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Abstract

Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis.

KEYWORDS:

Parkinson disease dementia; dementia

PMID:
27502301
DOI:
10.1177/0891988716654985
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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