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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2016 Dec;60(12):2712-2721. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201600566. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Use of antibiotics is associated with lower enterolactone plasma concentration.

Author information

1
Department of Animal Science, Aarhus University, Tjele, Denmark.
2
Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

SCOPE:

High enterolactone levels may have health benefits in relation to risk of noncommunicable diseases. Enterolactone is produced by the colonic microbiota after intake of lignans and treatment with antimicrobials may result in altered enterolactone production. This study investigates the association between antibiotic use and enterolactone concentration.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Using LC-MS/MS, enterolactone concentrations were quantified in plasma samples from 2237 participants from the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. The participants were healthy at enrollment, but were later diagnosed with cancer. At enrollment, participants had blood drawn and completed a food frequency questionnaire and lifestyle questionnaire. Antibiotic use was assessed as reimbursed antibiotic prescriptions up to 12 months before enrollment. Antibiotic use ≤3 months before enrollment was associated with a 41% (Δcrude : -41; 95% CI: -52, -28) lower enterolactone concentration in women and 12% in men (Δcrude : -12; 95% CI: -31, 11), while antibiotic use >3-12 months before enrollment was associated with 26% lower enterolactone in women (Δcrude : -26; 95% CI: -37, -14) and 14% in men (Δcrude : -14; 95% CI: -28, 1).

CONCLUSION:

Use of antibiotics up to 12 months before enrollment was associated with lower plasma enterolactone levels, especially among women.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotics; Enterolactone; Epidemiology; Lignans; Microbiota

PMID:
27500753
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.201600566
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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