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J Fluency Disord. 2016 Jun;48:44-55. doi: 10.1016/j.jfludis.2016.06.001. Epub 2016 Jun 21.

Phase II trial of a syllable-timed speech treatment for school-age children who stutter.

Author information

1
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: cheryl.andrews@sydney.edu.au.
2
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: susan.obrian@sydney.edu.au.
3
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: mark.onslow@sydney.edu.au.
4
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: ann.packman@sydney.edu.au.
5
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: ross.menzies@sydney.edu.au.
6
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: robyn.lowe@sydney.edu.au.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

A recent clinical trial (Andrews et al., 2012) showed Syllable Timed Speech (STS) to be a potentially useful treatment agent for the reduction of stuttering for school-age children. The present trial investigated a modified version of this program that incorporated parent verbal contingencies.

METHODS:

Participants were 22 stuttering children aged 6-11 years. Treatment involved training the children and their parents to use STS in conversation. Parents were also taught to use verbal contingencies in response to their child's stuttered and stutter-free speech and to praise their child's use of STS. Outcome assessments were conducted pre-treatment, at the completion of Stage 1 of the program and 6 months and 12 months after Stage 1 completion.

RESULTS:

Outcomes are reported for the 19 children who completed Stage 1 of the program. The group mean percent stuttering reduction was 77% from pre-treatment to 12 months post-treatment, and 82% with the two least responsive participants removed. There was considerable variation in response to the treatment. Eleven of the children showed reduced avoidance of speaking situations and 18 were more satisfied with their fluency post-treatment. However, there was some suggestion that stuttering control was not sufficient to fully eliminate situation avoidance for the children.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this trial are sufficiently encouraging to warrant further clinical trials of the method.

KEYWORDS:

Children; Fluency disorders; Response to intervention; Speech-language-pathology; Stuttering

PMID:
27498894
DOI:
10.1016/j.jfludis.2016.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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