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J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2017 Feb;30(1):96-101. doi: 10.1016/j.jpag.2016.07.003. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

Human Papillomavirus Awareness in Haiti: Preparing for a National HPV Vaccination Program.

Author information

1
Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
2
Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
3
Family Health Ministries, Durham, North Carolina.
4
Family Health Ministries, Durham, North Carolina; Duke Global Health Institute, Durham, North Carolina.
5
Department of Medicine, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
6
Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address: ntb@unc.edu.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

Cervical cancer morbidity and mortality are pressing public health issues that affect women in Haiti. To inform efforts to develop a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program in Haiti, we sought to understand HPV awareness and willingness to get HPV vaccination in Haiti.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

We interviewed a convenience sample of 475 women and men in 2 clinical settings in Port-au-Prince and Léogâne, Haiti between April and July 2014.

INTERVENTIONS AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

HPV awareness and willingness to get HPV vaccine for daughters.

RESULTS:

Few participants (27%, 130/475) had heard of HPV. Awareness of HPV was higher among respondents with a previous sexually transmitted infection compared with those without a previous sexually transmitted infection (odds ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-5.13). Adults who had heard of genital warts were also more likely to be aware of HPV compared with those who had not (odds ratio, 4.37; 95% confidence interval, 2.59-7.38). Only 10% (24/250) of parents had previously heard of HPV vaccine; however, after researchers explained the purpose of the vaccine, nearly all (96%, 240/250) said they would be willing to get HPV vaccine for their daughters if it were available.

CONCLUSION:

Despite low awareness of HPV in Haiti, interest in HPV vaccination was nearly universal in our study of health care-seeking adults. This high acceptability suggests that HPV vaccination programs instituted in Haiti would be well received.

KEYWORDS:

Cervical cancer; HPV awareness; HPV vaccine; Haiti; Human papillomavirus

PMID:
27498340
PMCID:
PMC5545972
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpag.2016.07.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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