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J Ethnopharmacol. 2016 Dec 4;193:169-178. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2016.08.010. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

Protective effects of the roots of Angelica sinensis on strenuous exercise-induced sports anemia in rats.

Author information

1
School of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shih-Chuan 1st Rd, Sanmin Dist., Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan. Electronic address: wxes9050304@gmail.com.
2
Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, 250, Wen-Hua 1st Rd, Guishan Dist., Taoyuan 33301, Taiwan.
3
School of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shih-Chuan 1st Rd, Sanmin Dist., Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan. Electronic address: ytwu@kmu.edu.tw.
4
Department of Sports Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shih-Chuan 1st Rd, Sanmin Dist., Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan. Electronic address: meichich@gmail.com.

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:

Sports anemia is a persistent and severe problem in athletes owing to strenuous exercise-induced oxidative stress and hepcidin upregulation. The roots of Angelica sinensis (AS), a familiar traditional Chinese medicine, has been used for replenishing blood since antiquity.

AIM OF THE STUDY:

To evaluate the effects of ethanolic AS extract in a 4-week study on sports anemia in female Wistar rats.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

To induce anemia, a strenuous exercise protocol consisting of running and swimming was employed with increasing intensity. Animals were randomly assigned to the following groups: control group; strenuous exercise group; and strenuous exercise and AS extract-treated group (300mgkg-1d-1). After 4 weeks, rats underwent exhaustive swimming and forelimb grip strength test. The blood biochemical markers and hepatic antioxidant activities were determined. Hepatic interleukin-6 and muscle glycogen were observed through immunohistochemical and Periodic acid-Schiff staining, respectively.

RESULTS:

AS extract (consisting of ferulic acid, Z-ligustilide, and n-butylidenephthalide) treatment improved forelimb grip strength and rescued exercise-induced anemia by significantly elevating the red blood cell counts and hemoglobin concentrations as well as hematocrit levels (p<0.05). AS modulated the iron metabolism through decreasing serum hepcidin-25 concentrations by 33.0% (p<0.05) and increasing serum iron levels by 34.3% (p<0.01). The hepatic injury marker serum alanine aminotransferase concentrations were also reduced, followed by increased antioxidant enzyme catalase expression in the liver (p<0.05). Furthermore, substantial attenuation of hepatic interleukin-6 expression and preservation of muscle glycogen content suggested the additional roles of AS acting on sports anemia and physical performance.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings evidenced a novel and promising therapeutic approach for AS treatment for rescuing the anemic condition induced following 4 weeks of strenuous exercise.

KEYWORDS:

Angelica sinensis; Blood; Hemolysis; Hepcidin; Iron deficiency; Oxidative stress; Z-ligustilide (PubChem CID: 5319022); ferulic acid (PubChem CID: 445858); n-butylidenephthalide (PubChem CID: 642376)

PMID:
27497636
DOI:
10.1016/j.jep.2016.08.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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