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Curr Hematol Malig Rep. 2016 Dec;11(6):456-461. doi: 10.1007/s11899-016-0341-2.

Social Media and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN): Analysis of Advanced Metrics From the First Year of a New Twitter Community: #MPNSM.

Author information

1
Department of Leukemia, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 428, PO BOX 301402, TX 77230-1402, Houston, TX, USA. npemmaraju@mdanderson.org.
2
Symplur LLC, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
The Elizabeth and Tony Comper MPN Program,-Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, ON, Canada.
4
CIC (Clinical Investigations Center, INSERM CIC 1427) Hôpital Saint-Louis & Université Paris Diderot, 1, Avenue Claude Vellefaux, 75010, Paris, France.
5
Division of Hematology & Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ, USA.
6
Aurora Research Institute, Aurora Health Care, Milwaukee, WI, USA.

Abstract

The social media platform Twitter has provided the hematology/oncology community with unprecedented, novel methods of interpersonal communication and increased ability for the dissemination of important updates in a rapidly moving field. The advent, and subsequent success, of disease-specific Twitter communities have further enabled interested healthcare stakeholders to become quickly organized around a unique set of rare medical conditions, such as hematologic malignancies, that, historically, generally lack large amounts of reliable online information. One example is the Twitter community #MPNSM (myeloproliferative neoplasms on social media), which was started approximately one and half years ago and has served as a recognized venue for discussion among many members of the MPN community, including patients, researchers, providers, and advocacy organizations. This article will focus on understanding the impact of the founding of this community via the analysis of advanced Twitter metrics of user experience, from the first year of use for this novel healthcare hashtag.

KEYWORDS:

Disease-specific hashtag; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative neoplasm; Polycythemia vera; Social media; Twitter

PMID:
27492118
DOI:
10.1007/s11899-016-0341-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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