Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Psychiatry. 2016 Nov;209(5):366-377. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

Longitudinal course of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia: systematic review.

Author information

1
Rianne M. van der Linde, PhD, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge; Tom Dening, FRCPsych, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham; Blossom C. M. Stephan, PhD, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University; A. Matthew Prina, PhD, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London; Elizabeth Evans, PhD, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University; Carol Brayne, MD, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, UK rmv23@medschl.cam.ac.uk.
2
Rianne M. van der Linde, PhD, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge; Tom Dening, FRCPsych, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham; Blossom C. M. Stephan, PhD, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University; A. Matthew Prina, PhD, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London; Elizabeth Evans, PhD, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University; Carol Brayne, MD, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

More information about the pattern of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in the course of dementia is needed to inform patients and clinicians and to design future interventions.

AIMS:

To determine the persistence and incidence of BPSD and their relation to cognitive function, in individuals with dementia or in cohorts investigated for dementia onset.

METHOD:

A systematic literature review analysed the baseline prevalence, persistence and incidence of 11 symptoms. The review was conducted according to established guidelines with the exception that we could not exclude the possibilities of bias in the studies examined.

RESULTS:

The 59 included studies showed considerable heterogeneity in their objectives and methods. The symptoms hyperactivity and apathy showed high persistence and incidence; depression and anxiety low or moderate persistence and moderate incidence; and psychotic symptoms low persistence with moderate or low incidence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite heterogeneity across studies in terms of setting, focus and length of follow-up, there were clinically relevant differences in the longitudinal courses of different BPSD. Apathy was the only symptom with high baseline prevalence, persistence and incidence during the course of dementia.

PMID:
27491532
PMCID:
PMC5100633
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.114.148403
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center