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J Periodontol. 2017 Jan;88(1):34-49. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

Is Trying to Quit Associated With Tooth Loss and Delayed Yearly Dental Visit Among Smokers? Results of the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Author information

1
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
2
Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
3
Department of General Education, Laboure College, Milton, MA.
4
Vasanta Health Science, Cambridge, MA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The rate of periodontitis in the US population has been estimated to be close to 50%. Patients with periodontitis, especially those who smoke, suffer from a high rate of tooth loss. The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate predictors of poor oral health and oral health habits among smokers and determine if trying to quit smoking is associated with better oral health or oral health habits in smokers in the United States.

METHODS:

Data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used in the analysis. After limiting the dataset to smokers, the designated exposure was respondent's report of trying to quit smoking (yes/no). Two logistic regression models were developed. One model identified factors associated with having a most recent dental visit longer than 1 year before the survey. The second model identified factors associated with loss of six or more teeth. Both models were controlled for confounding factors.

RESULTS:

After controlling for confounding, among smokers in the 2014 BRFSS, trying to quit was associated with significantly lower odds of respondents having their most recent dental visit longer than a year before the survey (odds ratio [OR]: 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.90 to 0.97) and was a significant risk factor for having lost six or more teeth (OR: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.10).

CONCLUSIONS:

Among smokers in the United States, trying to quit is associated with compliance with yearly dental visits and higher odds of lost teeth. Future research should investigate optimal approaches for providing smoking cessation services in the dental setting.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioral risk factor surveillance system; periodontitis; risk factors; smoking; smoking cessation; tooth loss

PMID:
27491012
DOI:
10.1902/jop.2016.160201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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