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Med Phys. 2016 Aug;43(8):4607. doi: 10.1118/1.4954846.

Multisource inverse-geometry CT. Part I. System concept and development.

Author information

1
CT Systems and Applications Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309.
2
Functional Imaging Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309.
3
School of Integrated Technology, Yonsei University, Incheon 406-840, South Korea.
4
Mechanical Systems Technologies, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309.
5
Design and Development Shops, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309.
6
High Energy Physics Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309.
7
Detector Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309.
8
High Frequency Power Electronics Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309.
9
Molecular Imaging and Computed Tomography, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188.
10
Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This paper presents an overview of multisource inverse-geometry computed tomography (IGCT) as well as the development of a gantry-based research prototype system. The development of the distributed x-ray source is covered in a companion paper [V. B. Neculaes et al., "Multisource inverse-geometry CT. Part II. X-ray source design and prototype," Med. Phys. 43, 4617-4627 (2016)]. While progress updates of this development have been presented at conferences and in journal papers, this paper is the first comprehensive overview of the multisource inverse-geometry CT concept and prototype. The authors also provide a review of all previous IGCT related publications.

METHODS:

The authors designed and implemented a gantry-based 32-source IGCT scanner with 22 cm field-of-view, 16 cm z-coverage, 1 s rotation time, 1.09 × 1.024 mm detector cell size, as low as 0.4 × 0.8 mm focal spot size and 80-140 kVp x-ray source voltage. The system is built using commercially available CT components and a custom made distributed x-ray source. The authors developed dedicated controls, calibrations, and reconstruction algorithms and evaluated the system performance using phantoms and small animals.

RESULTS:

The authors performed IGCT system experiments and demonstrated tube current up to 125 mA with up to 32 focal spots. The authors measured a spatial resolution of 13 lp/cm at 5% cutoff. The scatter-to-primary ratio is estimated 62% for a 32 cm water phantom at 140 kVp. The authors scanned several phantoms and small animals. The initial images have relatively high noise due to the low x-ray flux levels but minimal artifacts.

CONCLUSIONS:

IGCT has unique benefits in terms of dose-efficiency and cone-beam artifacts, but comes with challenges in terms of scattered radiation and x-ray flux limits. To the authors' knowledge, their prototype is the first gantry-based IGCT scanner. The authors summarized the design and implementation of the scanner and the authors presented results with phantoms and small animals.

PMID:
27487877
PMCID:
PMC4958105
DOI:
10.1118/1.4954846
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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