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Ann Occup Environ Med. 2016 Aug 2;28:32. doi: 10.1186/s40557-016-0121-4. eCollection 2016.

The association between perceived discrimination and depression/anxiety disorders among Korean workers: analysis of the third Korean Working Conditions Survey.

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1
Department of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Discrimination is a long-standing social problem, and interest in the health effects of discrimination has been increasing. Unfortunately, Korean workers experience various types and combinations of discrimination. This study aimed to examine the association between perceived discrimination and depression/anxiety disorders among Korean workers.

METHODS:

Data from 33,530 paid workers were extracted from the third Korean Working Conditions Survey. The data included general characteristics, occupational characteristics, perceived discrimination, and depression/anxiety disorders. To examine the relationship between perceived discrimination and depression/anxiety disorders, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate depression/anxiety disorders as the dependent variable and perceived discrimination as the independent variable, after adjusting for relevant general and occupational characteristics.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for the relevant general and occupational characteristics, we observed that male and female workers who had experienced perceived discrimination exhibited a significantly higher likelihood of having depression/anxiety disorders. The odds ratios among male and female workers were 3.25 (95 % confidence interval: 2.45-4.32) and 4.56 (95 % confidence interval: 3.45-6.03), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Perceived discrimination was significantly related to depression or anxiety disorders among Korean workers. The risk of depression or anxiety was higher among female workers, compared to male workers.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety disorder; Depression; Discrimination

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