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Drug Des Devel Ther. 2016 Jul 15;10:2289-97. doi: 10.2147/DDDT.S93941. eCollection 2016.

Galeterone for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer: the evidence to date.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
2
Department of Oncology and Urology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

Major advances have been achieved recently in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, resulting in significant improvements in quality of life and survival with the use of several new agents, including the next-generation androgen receptor (AR)-targeted drugs abiraterone and enzalutamide. However, virtually all patients will eventually progress on these therapies and most will ultimately die of treatment-refractory metastatic disease. Recently, several mechanisms of resistance to AR-directed therapies have been uncovered, including the AR splice variant 7 (AR-V7), which is a ligand-independent constitutionally-active form of the AR that has been associated with poor outcomes to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Galeterone, a potent anti-androgen with three modes of action (CYP17 lyase inhibition, AR antagonism, and AR degradation), is a novel agent under clinical development that could potentially target both full-length AR and aberrant AR, including AR-V7. In this manuscript, we will first discuss the biological mechanisms of action of galeterone and then review the safety and efficacy data from Phase I and II clinical studies of galeterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. A Phase III study of galeterone (compared against enzalutamide) in AR-V7-positive patients is currently underway, and represents the first pivotal trial using a biomarker-selection design in this disease.

KEYWORDS:

AR splice variants; AR-V7; castration-resistant prostate cancer; galeterone

PMID:
27486306
PMCID:
PMC4956059
DOI:
10.2147/DDDT.S93941
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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