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J Adv Nurs. 2017 Jan;73(1):162-176. doi: 10.1111/jan.13087. Epub 2016 Sep 21.

Sexual transmission-risk behaviour among HIV-positive persons: a multisite study using social action theory.

Author information

1
University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.
2
University of California San Francisco School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA.
3
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa School of Nursing, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
4
Rutgers State University, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA.
5
Case Western Reserve University School of Nursing, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
6
Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
7
Nursing Strategic Initiatives Harris Health System, Houston, Texas, USA.
8
Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
9
Baylor College of Medicine and AVP Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA.
10
Ohio State University College of Nursing, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
11
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Corpus, Christi, Texas, USA.
12
Hunter College, CUNY School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA.
13
University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA.
14
University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
15
Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

Sexual risk behaviour was explored and described using Social Action Theory.

BACKGROUND:

The sexual transmission of HIV is complex and multi-factorial. Social Action Theory provides a framework for viewing self-regulation of modifiable behaviour such as condom use. Condom use is viewed within the context of social interaction and interdependence.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey.

METHODS:

Self-report questionnaire administered to adults living with HIV/AIDS, recruited from clinics, service organizations and by active outreach, between 2010 - 2011.

FINDINGS:

Having multiple sex partners with inconsistent condom use during a 3-month recall period was associated with being male, younger age, having more years of education,substance use frequency and men having sex with men being a mode of acquiring HIV. In addition, lower self-efficacy for condom use scores were associated with having multiple sex partners and inconsistent condom use.

CONCLUSION:

Social Action Theory provided a framework for organizing data from an international sample of seropositive persons. Interventions for sexually active, younger, HIV positive men who have sex with men, that strengthen perceived efficacy for condom use, and reduce the frequency of substance use, may contribute to reducing HIV-transmission risk.

KEYWORDS:

HIV prevention; HIV self-management; HIV-positive adults; HIV-transmission risk; Social Action Theory; condom use; nursing; self-efficacy; sexual behaviour

PMID:
27485796
PMCID:
PMC5588908
DOI:
10.1111/jan.13087
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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