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Immunotherapy. 2016 Sep;8(9):1059-71. doi: 10.2217/imt-2016-0033.

Tumor-derived vaccines containing CD200 inhibit immune activation: implications for immunotherapy.

Author information

1
University of Minnesota, Pediatrics, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
2
Departments of Neurosurgery & Pathology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

Abstract

There are over 400 ongoing clinical trials using tumor-derived vaccines. This approach is especially attractive for many types of brain tumors, including glioblastoma, yet so far the clinical response is highly variable. One contributor to poor response is CD200, which acts as a checkpoint blockade, inducing immune tolerance. We demonstrate that, in response to vaccination, glioma-derived CD200 suppresses the anti-tumor immune response. In contrast, a CD200 peptide inhibitor that activates antigen-presenting cells overcomes immune tolerance. The addition of the CD200 inhibitor significantly increased leukocyte infiltration into the vaccine site, cytokine and chemokine production, and cytolytic activity. Our data therefore suggest that CD200 suppresses the immune system's response to vaccines, and that blocking CD200 could improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

KEYWORDS:

CD200 protein; checkpoint blockade; immunotherapy

PMID:
27485078
PMCID:
PMC5619161
DOI:
10.2217/imt-2016-0033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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