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Ageing Res Rev. 2016 Sep;30:49-60. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2016.06.001. Epub 2016 Jul 30.

Cerebral circulation in aging.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Clinical Research Institute, Yokohama General Hospital, Yokohama, Japan. Electronic address: nagata@yokoso.or.jp.
2
Department of Neurology, Clinical Research Institute, Yokohama General Hospital, Yokohama, Japan.
3
Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan.
4
Department of Neurology, Research Institute for Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita, Japan.
5
Department of Neurology, Noshiro Yamamoto Medical Association Hospital, Noshiro, Japan.

Abstract

Cerebral circulation is known to be protected by the regulatory function against the hypoperfusion that will affect the cognitive function as a result of brain ischemia and energy failure. The regulatory function includes cerebrovascular autoregulation, chemical control, metabolic control, and neurogenic control, and those compensatory mechanisms can be influenced by hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiac diseases, cerebrovascular diseases and aging. On the other hand, large and/or small infarction, intracranial hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, atherosclerosis, amylod angiopathy are also more directly associated with cognitive decline not only in those with vascular cognitive impairment or vascular dementia but also those with Alzheimer's disease.

PMID:
27484894
DOI:
10.1016/j.arr.2016.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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