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Sci Rep. 2016 Aug 3;6:30938. doi: 10.1038/srep30938.

Agglutinating mouse IgG3 compares favourably with IgMs in typing of the blood group B antigen: Functionality and stability studies.

Author information

1
Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Gronostajowa 7A, 30-387 Kraków, Poland.
2
Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Kraków, Poland.

Abstract

Mouse immunoglobulins M (IgMs) that recognize human blood group antigens induce haemagglutination and are used worldwide for diagnostic blood typing. Contrary to the current belief that IgGs are too small to simultaneously bind antigens on two different erythrocytes, we obtained agglutinating mouse IgG3 that recognized antigen B of the human ABO blood group system. Mouse IgG3 is an intriguing isotype that has the ability to form Fc-dependent oligomers. However, F(ab')2 fragments of the IgG3 were sufficient to agglutinate type B red blood cells; therefore, IgG3-triggered agglutination did not require oligomerization. Molecular modelling indicated that mouse IgG3 has a larger range of Fab arms than other mouse IgG subclasses and that the unique properties of mouse IgG3 are likely due to the structure of its hinge region. With a focus on applications in diagnostics, we compared the stability of IgG3 and two IgMs in formulated blood typing reagents using an accelerated storage approach and differential scanning calorimetry. IgG3 was much more stable than IgMs. Interestingly, the rapid decrease in IgM activity was caused by aggregation of the molecules and a previously unknown posttranslational proteolytic processing of the μ heavy chain. Our data point to mouse IgG3 as a potent diagnostic tool.

PMID:
27484487
PMCID:
PMC4971511
DOI:
10.1038/srep30938
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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