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Int J Mol Sci. 2016 Jul 29;17(8). pii: E1225. doi: 10.3390/ijms17081225.

The Metabolic Role of Gut Microbiota in the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cardiovascular Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Gastroenterology Unit, Federico II University of Naples, 80131 Napoli, Italy. marcosanduzzizamparelli@yahoo.it.
2
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Gastroenterology Unit, Federico II University of Naples, 80131 Napoli, Italy. comparedebora@libero.it.
3
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Gastroenterology Unit, Federico II University of Naples, 80131 Napoli, Italy. pietro.coccoli@unina.it.
4
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Gastroenterology Unit, Federico II University of Naples, 80131 Napoli, Italy. a.rocco@unina.it.
5
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Gastroenterology Unit, Federico II University of Naples, 80131 Napoli, Italy. olga.nardone@libero.it.
6
Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome, 00168 Rome, Italy. giusmarrone@gmail.com.
7
Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome, 00168 Rome, Italy. antonio.gasbarrini@unicatt.it.
8
Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome, 00168 Rome, Italy. antonio.grieco@unicatt.it.
9
Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome, 00168 Rome, Italy. luca.miele@policlinicogemelli.it.
10
Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome, 00168 Rome, Italy. nardone@unina.it.

Abstract

The prevalence of metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which are common risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), has dramatically increased worldwide over the last decades. Although dietary habit is the main etiologic factor, there is an imperfect correlation between dietary habits and the development of metabolic disease. Recently, research has focused on the role of the microbiome in the development of these disorders. Indeed, gut microbiota is implicated in many metabolic functions and an altered gut microbiota is reported in metabolic disorders. Here we provide evidence linking gut microbiota and metabolic diseases, focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association.

KEYWORDS:

NAFLD; cardiovascular disease; gut microbiota

PMID:
27483246
PMCID:
PMC5000623
DOI:
10.3390/ijms17081225
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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