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J Crit Care. 2016 Oct;35:105-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2016.05.007. Epub 2016 May 12.

Changes in peripheral perfusion relate to visceral organ perfusion in early septic shock: A pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and General Intensive Care Medicine, Salzburg University Hospital and Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.
2
Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Central State University Hospital, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.
3
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY; Departamento de Medicina Intensiva, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de, Chile, Santiago.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and General Intensive Care Medicine, Salzburg University Hospital and Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address: M.Duenser@salk.at.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To correlate clinical indicators of peripheral perfusion with visceral organ vascular tone in 30 septic shock patients.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In a prospective pilot study, capillary refill time, the Mottling score, and peripheral temperature were determined within 24, 48, and 72 hours after intensive care unit admission. Simultaneously, pulsatility indices in the liver, spleen, kidneys, and intestines were measured by Doppler ultrasonography. Correlation analyses were calculated, applying an adjusted significance level (P< .0125) to correct for multiple testing.

RESULTS:

Significant relationships were observed between the pulsatility index of selected organs and the capillary refill time (intestines: r= 0.325, P= .007), and the Mottling score (kidneys: r= 0.396, P= .006), but not peripheral temperature (all r< 0.14, P> .05). An association over time was observed for the capillary refill time and pulsatility index of the liver (P= .04) and intestines (P= .03) as well as for the Mottling score and the kidneys' pulsatility index (P= .03), but not for peripheral temperature and any visceral organs' pulsatility index.

CONCLUSIONS:

Capillary refill time and skin mottling may be correlated with the pulsatility index, a sonographic surrogate of vascular tone, of visceral organs in early septic shock.

KEYWORDS:

Capillary refill time; Peripheral perfusion; Pulsatility index; Septic shock; Skin mottling; Visceral vascular tone

PMID:
27481743
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2016.05.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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