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Dig Liver Dis. 2016 Nov;48(11):1302-1307. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2016.07.012. Epub 2016 Jul 21.

Nationwide prevalence and drug treatment practices of inflammatory bowel diseases in Hungary: A population-based study based on the National Health Insurance Fund database.

Author information

1
1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
2
Strategic Analysis Department, National Health Insurance Fund (OEP), Budapest, Hungary.
3
1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. Electronic address: lakatos.peter_laszlo@med.semmelweis-univ.hu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory diseases associated with a substantial healthcare utilization.

AIM:

Our aim was to estimate the national prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), CD and UC and to describe current drug treatment practices in CD and UC.

METHODS:

Patients and drug dispensing events were identified according to international classification codes for UC and CD in in-patient care, non-primary out-patient care and drug prescription databases (2011-2013) of the National Health Insurance Fund.

RESULTS:

A total of 55,039 individuals (men: 44.6%) with physician-diagnosed IBD were alive in Hungary in 2013, corresponding to a prevalence of 0.55% (95% CI, 0.55-0.56). The prevalence of CD 0.20% (95% CI, 0.19-0.20), and UC was 0.34% (95% CI, 0.33-0.34). The prevalence both in men and women was the highest in the 20-39 year-olds in CD. Current use of immunosuppressives and biological therapy was highest in the pediatric CD population (44% and 15%) followed by adult CD (33% and 9%), while their use was lowest in elderly patients. Interestingly, current use of 5-ASA (5-aminosalicylates) was high in both UC and CD irrespective of the age group.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Hungarian IBD prevalence based on nationwide database of the National Health Insurance Fund was high. We identified significant differences in the drug prescription practices according to age-groups.

KEYWORDS:

Drug treatment strategy; Epidemiology; Inflammatory bowel disease; Prevalence; Public health registry data

PMID:
27481587
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2016.07.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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