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Sci Rep. 2016 Aug 2;6:30594. doi: 10.1038/srep30594.

Role of the Gut Microbiome in Modulating Arthritis Progression in Mice.

Author information

1
Department of Rheumatology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China.
2
Department of Laboratory Animal Science, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China.
3
Department of Infectious Diseases, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China.

Abstract

Genetics alone cannot explain most cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus, investigating environmental factors such as the gut microbiota may provide new insights into the initiation and progression of RA. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA sequencing to characterise the gut microbiota of DBA1 mice that did or did not develop arthritis after induction with collagen. We found that divergence in the distribution of microbiota after induction was pronounced and significant. Mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) showed enriched operational taxonomic units (OTUs) affiliated with the genus Lactobacillus as the dominant genus prior to arthritis onset. With disease development, the abundance of OTUs affiliated with the families Bacteroidaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and S24-7 increased significantly in CIA-susceptible mice. Notably, germ-free mice conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-susceptible mice showed a higher frequency of arthritis induction than those conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-resistant mice. Consistently, the concentration of the cytokine interleukin-17 in serum and the proportions of CD8+T cells and Th17 lymphocytes in the spleen were significantly higher in the former group, whereas the abundances of dendritic cells, B cells, and Treg cells in the spleen were significantly lower. Our results suggest that the gut microbiome influences arthritis susceptibility.

PMID:
27481047
PMCID:
PMC4969881
DOI:
10.1038/srep30594
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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