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Clin Exp Nephrol. 2017 Jun;21(3):457-464. doi: 10.1007/s10157-016-1315-3. Epub 2016 Aug 1.

Association of interactions between dietary salt consumption and hypertension-susceptibility genetic polymorphisms with blood pressure among Japanese male workers.

Author information

1
Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
2
Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. mando@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp.
3
Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan.
4
Department of CKD Initiatives, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
5
Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan.
6
Program in Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
7
Safety and Health Promotion Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Toyota, Japan.
8
R & D management Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Toyota, Japan.
9
Innovative Research Center for Preventative Medical Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Blood pressure is influenced by hereditary factors and dietary habits. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of dietary salt consumption and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on blood pressure (BP).

METHODS:

This was a cross-sectional analysis of 2728 male participants who participated in a health examination in 2009. Average dietary salt consumption was estimated using electronically collected meal purchase data from cafeteria. A multivariate analysis, adjusting for clinically relevant factors, was conducted to examine whether the effect on BP of salt consumption, SNPs, and interaction between salt consumption and each SNP. This study examined the SNPs AGT rs699 (Met235Thr), ADD1 rs4961 (Gly460Trp), NPPA rs5063 (Val32Met), GPX1 rs1050450 (Pro198Leu), and AGTR1 rs5186 (A1166C) in relation to hypertension and salt sensitivity.

RESULTS:

BP was not significantly associated with SNPs or salt consumption. The interaction between salt consumption and SNPs with systolic BP showed a significant association in NPPA rs5063 (Val32Met) (P = 0.023) and a marginal trend toward significance in rs4961 and rs1050450 (P = 0.060 and 0.067, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

The effect of salt consumption on BP differed by genotype. Dietary salt consumption and genetic variation can predict a high risk of hypertension.

KEYWORDS:

Dietary; Hypertension; NPPA; Single nucleotide polymorphism; Sodium chloride

PMID:
27480094
DOI:
10.1007/s10157-016-1315-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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