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Mol Microbiol. 2016 Nov;102(3):506-519. doi: 10.1111/mmi.13475. Epub 2016 Aug 18.

Lactic acid bacteria differentially regulate filamentation in two heritable cell types of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

Author information

  • 1State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
  • 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
  • 3Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 N. Lake Road, Merced, CA, 95343, USA.
  • 4State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
  • 5State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. huanggh@im.ac.cn.
  • 6University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. huanggh@im.ac.cn.

Abstract

Microorganisms rarely exist as single species in natural environments. The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are common members of the microbiota of several human niches such as the mouth, gut and vagina. Lactic acid bacteria are known to suppress filamentation, a key virulence feature of C. albicans, through the production of lactic acid and other metabolites. Here we report that C. albicans cells switch between two heritable cell types, white and opaque, to undergo filamentation to adapt to diversified environments. We show that acidic pH conditions caused by LAB and low temperatures support opaque cell filamentation, while neutral pH conditions and high temperatures promote white cell filamentation. The cAMP signalling pathway and the Rfg1 transcription factor play major roles in regulating the responses to these conditions. This cell type-specific response of C. albicans to different environmental conditions reflects its elaborate regulatory control of phenotypic plasticity.

PMID:
27479705
PMCID:
PMC5074855
[Available on 2017-11-01]
DOI:
10.1111/mmi.13475
[PubMed - in process]
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