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Cell Rep. 2016 Aug 9;16(6):1664-1676. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.07.005. Epub 2016 Jul 28.

Nucleolin-Mediated RNA Localization Regulates Neuron Growth and Cycling Cell Size.

Author information

1
Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA.
3
Mass Spectrometry Facility, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
4
Department of Chemical Research Support, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel.
5
Tnuva, Bet Shean 11710, Israel.
6
F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
7
Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel. Electronic address: mike.fainzilber@weizmann.ac.il.

Abstract

How can cells sense their own size to coordinate biosynthesis and metabolism with their growth needs? We recently proposed a motor-dependent bidirectional transport mechanism for axon length and cell size sensing, but the nature of the motor-transported size signals remained elusive. Here, we show that motor-dependent mRNA localization regulates neuronal growth and cycling cell size. We found that the RNA-binding protein nucleolin is associated with importin β1 mRNA in axons. Perturbation of nucleolin association with kinesins reduces its levels in axons, with a concomitant reduction in axonal importin β1 mRNA and protein levels. Strikingly, subcellular sequestration of nucleolin or importin β1 enhances axonal growth and causes a subcellular shift in protein synthesis. Similar findings were obtained in fibroblasts. Thus, subcellular mRNA localization regulates size and growth in both neurons and cycling cells.

PMID:
27477284
PMCID:
PMC4978702
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.07.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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