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Ann Pharm Fr. 2016 Nov;74(6):413-420. doi: 10.1016/j.pharma.2016.06.005. Epub 2016 Jul 27.

[Enzymes for disrupting bacterial communication, an alternative to antibiotics?]

[Article in French]

Author information

1
IRD 198, Inserm 1095, URMITE, UM63, CNRS 7278, Aix Marseille université, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France; Gene&GreenTK, faculté de médecine, 27, boulevard Jean-Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 5, France.
2
Gene&GreenTK, faculté de médecine, 27, boulevard Jean-Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 5, France.
3
Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics & Biotechnology Institute, University of Minnesota, 55108 St. Paul, MN, États-Unis.
4
Gene&GreenTK, faculté de médecine, 27, boulevard Jean-Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 5, France. Electronic address: david.daude@gene-greentk.com.
5
IRD 198, Inserm 1095, URMITE, UM63, CNRS 7278, Aix Marseille université, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France. Electronic address: eric.chabriere@univ-amu.fr.

Abstract

Quorum sensing (QS) is used by bacteria to communicate and synchronize their actions according to the cell density. In this way, they produce and secrete in the surrounding environment small molecules dubbed autoinducers (AIs) that regulate the expression of certain genes. The phenotypic traits regulated by QS are diverse and include pathogenicity, biofilm formation or resistance to anti-microbial treatments. The strategy, aiming at disrupting QS, known as quorum quenching (QQ), has emerged to counteract bacterial virulence and involves QS-inhibitors (QSI) or QQ-enzymes degrading AIs. Differently from antibiotics, QQ aims at blocking cell signaling and does not alter bacterial survival. This considerably decreases the selection pressure as compared to bactericide treatments and may reduce the occurrence of resistance mechanisms. QQ-enzymes are particularly appealing as they may disrupt molecular QS-signal without entering the cell and in a catalytic way. This review covers several aspects of QQ-based medical applications and the potential subsequent emergence of resistance is discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Bacterial virulence; Biofilm; Lactonase; Quorum quenching; Quorum sensing; Virulence bactérienne

PMID:
27475310
DOI:
10.1016/j.pharma.2016.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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