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J Adolesc Health. 2016 Oct;59(4):465-71. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.05.016. Epub 2016 Jul 27.

The Detroit Young Adult Asthma Project: Pilot of a Technology-Based Medication Adherence Intervention for African-American Emerging Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. Electronic address: kkolmodin@med.wayne.edu.
2
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan.
3
College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.
4
University of Windsor, Faculty of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, Windsor, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To conduct a randomized controlled pilot of a multicomponent, technology-based intervention promoting adherence to controller medication in African-American emerging adults with asthma. The intervention consisted of two computer-delivered sessions based on motivational interviewing combined with text messaged reminders between sessions.

METHODS:

Participants (N = 49) were 18-29 years old, African-American, with persistent asthma requiring controller medication. Participants had to report poor medication adherence and asthma control. Youth were randomized to receive the intervention or an attention control. Data were collected through computer-delivered self-report questionnaires at baseline, 1, and 3 months. Ecological Momentary Assessment via two-way text messaging was also used to collect "real-time" data on medication use and asthma control.

RESULTS:

The intervention was feasible and acceptable to the target population, as evidenced by high retention rates and satisfaction scores. Changes in study outcomes from pre- to postintervention favored the intervention, particularly for decrease in asthma symptoms, t (42) = 2.22, p < .05 (Cohen's d = .071).

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest that the intervention is feasible and effective. However, findings are preliminary and should be replicated with a larger sample and more sophisticated data analyses.

KEYWORDS:

African-American; Asthma; Emerging adults; Health disparities; Medication adherence; Motivational interviewing; Technology; mHealth

PMID:
27475032
PMCID:
PMC5035614
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.05.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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