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Carbohydr Polym. 2016 Oct 20;151:716-724. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.06.025. Epub 2016 Jun 6.

Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

Author information

1
CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China. Electronic address: liuchao@qibebt.ac.cn.
2
CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101, China. Electronic address: libin@qibebt.ac.cn.
3
Tianjin Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper, College of Papermaking Science and Technology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457, China. Electronic address: haishundu@163.com.
4
CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101, China. Electronic address: lvdong@qibebt.ac.cn.
5
CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101, China. Electronic address: zhangyd@qibebt.ac.cn.
6
CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101, China. Electronic address: yuguang@qibebt.ac.cn.
7
CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101, China. Electronic address: muxd@qibebt.ac.cn.
8
CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101, China. Electronic address: penghui@qibebt.ac.cn.

Abstract

In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production.

KEYWORDS:

Cellulose nanocrystals; Cellulose nanofibrils; Corncob residue; Formic acid hydrolysis; Nanocellulose; PFI refining

PMID:
27474618
DOI:
10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.06.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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