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Reprod Biomed Online. 2016 Oct;33(4):513-521. doi: 10.1016/j.rbmo.2016.07.002. Epub 2016 Jul 20.

Maternal physical and sedentary activities in relation to reproductive outcomes following IVF.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: ajg219@mail.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
3
Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center and Harvard Medical School, 32 Fruit Street, Suite 10A, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Environmental Health, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
4
Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center and Harvard Medical School, 32 Fruit Street, Suite 10A, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center and Harvard Medical School, 32 Fruit Street, Suite 10A, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Environmental Health, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
6
Department of Nutrition, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

Physical activity could benefit reproductive function through its ability to regulate energy balance and improve insulin sensitivity, but its association with IVF outcomes remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether pre-treatment physical and sedentary activity is associated with outcomes of IVF. The Environment and Reproductive Health Study is an ongoing prospective cohort study that enrols subfertile couples at Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center. Time spent in physical and sedentary activities in the year before IVF treatment is self-reported using a validated questionnaire. This analysis included 273 women who underwent 427 IVF cycles. Women engaged in a median of 2.8 h per week of moderate-to-vigorous activities. Time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activities and total metabolic equivalent task hours before IVF were not associated with probability of implantation, clinical pregnancy or live birth. Of the specific physical activities, only greater time spent in aerobics, rowing, and on the ski or stair machine was associated with higher probability of live birth. Time spent in total and specific sedentary activities were not associated with clinical outcomes of IVF. Physical activity is unlikely to have a deleterious effect on IVF success and certain forms of vigorous activity may be beneficial.

KEYWORDS:

assisted reproductive technology; in vitro fertilization; physical activity; sedentary activity

PMID:
27474489
PMCID:
PMC5053884
DOI:
10.1016/j.rbmo.2016.07.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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