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Braz J Infect Dis. 2016 Sep-Oct;20(5):437-43. doi: 10.1016/j.bjid.2016.06.006. Epub 2016 Jul 26.

Ventilator-associated pneumonia: the influence of bacterial resistance, prescription errors, and de-escalation of antimicrobial therapy on mortality rates.

Author information

1
Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), Faculdade de Medicina, Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil; Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), Hospital de Clínicas, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil. Electronic address: acsouzao@yahoo.com.br.
2
Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), Faculdade de Medicina, Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil; Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), Hospital de Clínicas, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.
3
Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), Hospital de Clínicas, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.
4
Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), Faculdade de Medicina, Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil; Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.

Abstract

Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most prevalent nosocomial infection in intensive care units and is associated with high mortality rates (14-70%).

AIM:

This study evaluated factors influencing mortality of patients with Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including bacterial resistance, prescription errors, and de-escalation of antibiotic therapy.

METHODS:

This retrospective study included 120 cases of Ventilator-associated pneumonia admitted to the adult adult intensive care unit of the Federal University of Uberlândia. The chi-square test was used to compare qualitative variables. Student's t-test was used for quantitative variables and multiple logistic regression analysis to identify independent predictors of mortality.

FINDINGS:

De-escalation of antibiotic therapy and resistant bacteria did not influence mortality. Mortality was 4 times and 3 times higher, respectively, in patients who received an inappropriate antibiotic loading dose and in patients whose antibiotic dose was not adjusted for renal function. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed the incorrect adjustment for renal function was the only independent factor associated with increased mortality.

CONCLUSION:

Prescription errors influenced mortality of patients with Ventilator-associated pneumonia, underscoring the challenge of proper Ventilator-associated pneumonia treatment, which requires continuous reevaluation to ensure that clinical response to therapy meets expectations.

KEYWORDS:

Bacterial resistance; De-escalation of antibiotic therapy; Prescription errors; Ventilator-associated pneumonia

PMID:
27473893
DOI:
10.1016/j.bjid.2016.06.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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