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Acta Otolaryngol. 2016 Dec;136(12):1273-1277. Epub 2016 Jul 28.

Twice-daily application of topical corticosteroids with a squirt system for patients with steroid-responsive olfactory impairment.

Author information

1
a Department of Otolaryngology , Taipei Veterans General Hospital , Taipei , Taiwan.
2
b Institute of Brain Science , National Yang-Ming University , Taipei , Taiwan.
3
c Department of Otolaryngology , National Yang-Ming University , Taipei , Taiwan.

Abstract

CONCLUSION:

Twice-daily topical corticosteroid treatment using a squirt system was beneficial in maintaining improvements in olfactory dysfunction which had been achieved by oral steroid treatment.

OBJECTIVES:

Some patients suffering from olfactory dysfunction respond well to corticosteroids. However, maintaining these improvements is challenging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the maintenance effect of twice-daily topical steroid treatment using a squirt system.

METHODS:

Twenty-two anosmic patients with an increase in odor threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) scores in Sniffin' Sticks tests by more than six points after 1-week of oral steroid treatment were enrolled. All the patients used a squirt system to apply topical corticosteroids and were followed up at 1, 3, and 6 months.

RESULTS:

Nineteen, 16, and 10 patients were followed-up at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment, respectively. All the patients had significant visual analog scale scores improvements compared to pre-treatment. The mean improvements in TDI scores were 9.80 (p < 0.001), 11.58 (p = 0.001), and 13.87 (p = 0.005) after 1, 3, and 6 months of treatment, respectively. The self-rated and objective olfactory function scores were maintained with steroid squirt therapy without significant decline, even in the patients who were followed up for 6 months.

KEYWORDS:

Corticosteroid; Sniffin’ Sticks Test; olfactory dysfunction; smell; squirt; steroid responsive anosmia

PMID:
27468143
DOI:
10.1080/00016489.2016.1203992
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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