Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neurophysiol. 2016 Oct 1;116(4):1840-1847. doi: 10.1152/jn.00513.2016. Epub 2016 Jul 27.

Magnetoencephalography-based identification of functional connectivity network disruption following mild traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
2
Department of Neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
3
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Brain Mapping Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
4
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition and University of Pittsburgh Brain Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and.
5
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition and University of Pittsburgh Brain Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and.
6
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; niranjana@upmc.edu.

Abstract

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) leads to long-term cognitive sequelae in a significant portion of patients. Disruption of normal neural communication across functional brain networks may explain the deficits in memory and attention observed after mTBI. In this study, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine functional connectivity during a resting state in a group of mTBI subjects (n = 9) compared with age-matched control subjects (n = 15). We adopted a data-driven, exploratory analysis in source space using phase locking value across different frequency bands. We observed a significant reduction in functional connectivity in band-specific networks in mTBI compared with control subjects. These networks spanned multiple cortical regions involved in the default mode network (DMN). The DMN is thought to subserve memory and attention during periods when an individual is not engaged in a specific task, and its disruption may lead to cognitive deficits after mTBI. We further applied graph theoretical analysis on the functional connectivity matrices. Our data suggest reduced local efficiency in different brain regions in mTBI patients. In conclusion, MEG can be a potential tool to investigate and detect network alterations in patients with mTBI. The value of MEG to reveal potential neurophysiological biomarkers for mTBI patients warrants further exploration.

KEYWORDS:

concussion; default mode network; functional connectivity; graph theory; magnetoencephalography; phase locking value; resting-state analysis; traumatic brain injury

PMID:
27466136
PMCID:
PMC5144712
DOI:
10.1152/jn.00513.2016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center