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Plast Reconstr Surg. 2016 Aug;138(2):273e-81e. doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000002384.

Improved Short-Term Outcomes following Orthognathic Surgery Are Associated with High-Volume Centers.

Author information

1
Ann Arbor, Mich.; and New Haven, Conn. From the Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Michigan Health System; and the Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies assessing outcomes following orthognathic surgery rely primarily on single-center/surgeon experience. In addition to issues of generalizability, these studies are limited in evaluating the effect of operative volume on patient outcomes.

METHODS:

Orthognathic procedures were identified in the 1999 to 2011 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Outcomes included occurrence of any in-hospital complication, extended length of stay (>2 days), and increased costs (>$10,784). High-volume hospitals were defined as the 90th percentile of case volume or higher (>31 cases/year). Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify independent predictors of outcomes. Trend analyses were performed to assess changes in the annual rate of patients treated at high-volume hospitals over the study period.

RESULTS:

Among 101,692 orthognathic surgery patients, 19.6 percent underwent concurrent ancillary procedures (i.e., genioplasty, rhinoplasty, or septoplasty), and 37.6 percent underwent double-jaw surgery. Fifty-three percent were treated at high-volume hospitals. High-volume hospitals more often performed ancillary procedures (21.4 percent versus 17.4 percent; p < 0.001) and double-jaw surgery (41.3 percent versus 33.4 percent; p < 0.001). After adjustments for clinical and hospital characteristics, patients treated at high-volume hospitals were less likely to experience any complication (OR, 0.75; 95 percent CI, 0.70 to 0.81; p < 0.001) and extended length of stay (OR, 0.71; 95 percent CI, 0.68 to 0.75; p < 0.001). There was a 2 percent annual increase in the rate of patients treated at high-volume hospitals over the study period (incidence rate ratio, 1.02; 95 percent CI, 1.01 to 1.03; p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The majority of orthognathic cases nationwide are performed at a small number of high-volume hospitals. These hospitals discharge patients earlier, perform more complex procedures, and have fewer complications.

CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Risk, III.

PMID:
27465190
DOI:
10.1097/PRS.0000000000002384
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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