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J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2016 Apr;9(4):18-24. Epub 2016 Apr 1.

Status Report from the Scientific Panel on Antibiotic Use in Dermatology of the American Acne and Rosacea Society: Part 1: Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns, Sources of Antibiotic Exposure, Antibiotic Consumption and Emergence of Antibiotic Resistance, Impact of Alterations in Antibiotic Prescribing, and Clinical Sequelae of Antibiotic Use.

Author information

1
Dermatology Adjunct Faculty, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, Nevada.
2
Department of Dermatology, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
3
Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
4
Department of Dermatology, Penn State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania.
5
Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
6
Department of Dermatology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California.
7
University of Florida Dental School, Gainesville, Florida.
8
Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
9
Department of Dermatology (Pediatrics), University of California San Diego, San Diego, California.

Abstract

Oral and topical antibiotics are commonly prescribed in dermatologie practice, often for noninfectious disorders, such as acne vulgaris and rosacea. Concerns related to antibiotic exposure from both medical and nonmedical sources require that clinicians consider in each case why and how antibiotics are being used and to make appropriate adjustments to limit antibiotic exposure whenever possible. This first article of a three-part series discusses prescribing patterns in dermatology, provides an overview of sources of antibiotic exposure, reviews the relative correlations between the magnitude of antibiotic consumption and emergence of antibiotic resistance patterns, evaluates the impact of alterations in antibiotic prescribing, and discusses the potential relevance and clinical sequelae of antibiotic use, with emphasis on how antibiotics are used in dermatology.

PMID:
27462384
PMCID:
PMC4898580

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