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Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 2016;397:133-60. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-41171-2_7.

Listeria monocytogenes and the Inflammasome: From Cytosolic Bacteriolysis to Tumor Immunotherapy.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1550 Linden Dr. Rm 4203, Madison, WI, 53706, USA.
2
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1550 Linden Dr. Rm 4203, Madison, WI, 53706, USA. sauer3@wisc.edu.

Abstract

Inflammasomes are cytosolic innate immune surveillance systems that recognize a variety of danger signals, including those from pathogens. Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterium evolved to live within the harsh environment of the host cytosol. Further, L. monocytogenes can activate a robust cell-mediated immune response that is being harnessed as an immunotherapeutic platform. Access to the cytosol is critical for both causing disease and inducing a protective immune response, and it is hypothesized that the cytosolic innate immune system, including the inflammasome, is critical for both host protection and induction of long-term immunity. L. monocytogenes can activate a variety of inflammasomes via its pore-forming toxin listeriolysin-O, flagellin, or DNA released through bacteriolysis; however, inflammasome activation attenuates L. monocytogenes, and as such, L. monocytogenes has evolved a variety of ways to limit inflammasome activation. Surprisingly, inflammasome activation also impairs the host cell-mediated immune response. Thus, understanding how L. monocytogenes activates or avoids detection by the inflammasome is critical to understand the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes and improve the cell-mediated immune response generated to L. monocytogenes for more effective immunotherapies.

KEYWORDS:

AIM2; Adaptive immunity; Immunotherapy; Inflammasome; Innate immunity macrophage; Listeria monocytogenes

PMID:
27460808
PMCID:
PMC5027901
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-41171-2_7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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