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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Nov;70(11):1325-1331. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2016.132. Epub 2016 Jul 27.

Associations between CD36 gene polymorphisms, fat tolerance and oral fat preference in a young-adult population.

Author information

1
Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia.
2
School of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

CD36 is known to be an orosensory receptor for dietary long-chain fatty acids, as well as being involved in the chemosensory mechanisms within the human gut. Recent data have demonstrated an association between CD36 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and lipid consumption behaviours in humans. This study aimed to test for associations between CD36 SNPs and response to a high-fat meal in a young healthy Australian cohort. Secondary associations were tested between CD36 gene variants and fasting lipid parameters, body composition, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and measures of oral fat preference.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

Two SNPs (rs1527479 and rs1984112) were assessed for associations with response to a 75 g saturated fat oral fat tolerance test (OFTT), whole-body substrate oxidation, fasting plasma lipids, CVD risk factors and self-reported habitual diet questionnaires. Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction.

RESULTS:

Cross-sectional data were collected on 56 individuals (28 m, 28 f; 24.9±3.3 years), with 42 completing participation in a high-fat OFTT. No genotypic associations were evident in anthropometric data or self-reported fat preference measures. AA SNP carriers at rs1984112 exhibited significantly elevated fasting triglyceride when compared with non-carriers (P=0.024). This group also tended to have an elevated response to a high-fat meal (P=0.078).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although these data show the potential pleiotropic influence of CD36 SNP rs1984112 on lipoprotein accumulation in a young healthy cohort, further assessment in a larger cohort is warranted.

PMID:
27460265
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2016.132
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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