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PLoS One. 2016 Jul 25;11(7):e0159855. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159855. eCollection 2016.

Maternal Age of Menarche and Blood Pressure in Adolescence: Evidence from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" Birth Cohort.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China.
2
City University of New York, School of Public Health and Hunter College, New York, New York, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Age of puberty has declined substantially in developed settings and is now declining in the rest of the world with economic development. Early age of puberty is associated with non-communicable diseases in adulthood, and may be a long-term driver of population health with effects over generations. In a non-Western setting, we examined the association of maternal age of menarche with blood pressure in late childhood/adolescence.

METHODS:

We used generalised estimating equations to estimate the adjusted association of maternal age of menarche with age-, sex- and height-adjusted blood pressure z-score from 10 to 16 years in Hong Kong's population-representative birth cohort, "Children of 1997" (n = 8327). We also assessed whether associations were mediated by body mass index (BMI) or pubertal stage.

RESULTS:

Earlier maternal age of menarche was associated with higher systolic blood pressure in adolescence [-0.02 z-score per year older maternal age of menarche, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.04 to -0.003]. The association of maternal age of menarche with systolic blood pressure was mediated by adiposity and/or pubertal stage at 11 years. Maternal age of menarche was not associated with diastolic blood pressure.

CONCLUSION:

Earlier maternal age of puberty was associated with higher systolic blood pressure, largely mediated by adiposity, highlighting the importance of tackling childhood obesity as a public health priority in view of the secular trend of declining age of puberty.

PMID:
27454175
PMCID:
PMC4959736
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0159855
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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