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Alzheimers Dement (Amst). 2016 Jun 22;3:91-7. doi: 10.1016/j.dadm.2016.05.004. eCollection 2016.

MCP-1 and eotaxin-1 selectively and negatively associate with memory in MCI and Alzheimer's disease dementia phenotypes.

Author information

1
Rocky Mountain Alzheimer's Disease Center, Departments of Neurosurgery and Neurology, University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Aurora, CA, USA; Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
2
Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
3
Neuroscience Research Institute, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

MCP-1 and eotaxin-1 are encoded on chromosome 17 and have been shown to reduce hippocampal neurogenesis in mice. We investigated whether these chemokines selectively associate with memory in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia.

METHODS:

MCP-1 and eotaxin-1 were assayed in controls, MCI, and AD dementia patients with varying phenotypes (n = 171). A subset of 55 individuals had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans available. Composite scores for cognitive variables were created, and medial temporal lobe volumes were obtained.

RESULTS:

An interaction was noted between MCP-1 and eotaxin-1, such that deleterious associations with memory were seen when both chemokines were elevated. These associations remained significant after adding APOE genotype and comparison (non-chromosome 17) chemokines into the model. These chemokines predicted left medial temporal lobe volume and were not related to other cognitive domains.

DISCUSSION:

These results suggest a potentially selective role for MCP-1 and eotaxin-1 in memory dysfunction in the context of varied MCI and AD dementia phenotypes.

KEYWORDS:

Chemokines; Episodic memory; Inflammation; Neuroimaging; Neuropsychology

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