Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Microb Pathog. 2016 Oct;99:19-29. doi: 10.1016/j.micpath.2016.07.012. Epub 2016 Jul 22.

Antifungal potential of eugenyl acetate against clinical isolates of Candida species.

Author information

1
Excellent Research Laboratory on Natural Products, Faculty of Science, and Natural Product Research Center of Excellence, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112, Thailand.
2
Excellent Research Laboratory on Natural Products, Faculty of Science, and Natural Product Research Center of Excellence, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112, Thailand; Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112, Thailand.
3
Clinical Microbiology Unit, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112, Thailand.
4
Excellent Research Laboratory on Natural Products, Faculty of Science, and Natural Product Research Center of Excellence, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112, Thailand; Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112, Thailand. Electronic address: supayang.v@psu.ac.th.

Abstract

The study evaluated the efficiency of eugenyl acetate (EA), a phytochemical in clove essential oil, against clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida glabrata. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of EA against Candida isolates were in the range between 0.1% and 0.4% (v/v). Spot assay further confirmed the susceptibility of Candida isolates to the compound upon treatment with respective 1 × MIC. Growth profile measured in time kill study evidence that the compound at 1 × MIC and 1/2 × MIC retarded the growth of Candida cells, divulging the fungicidal activity. Light microscopic observation demonstrated that upon treated with EA, rough cell morphology, cell damage, and fragmented patterns were observed in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. Furthermore, unusual morphological changes of the organism were observed in scanning electron microscopic study. Therefore, it is validated that the compound could cause cell damage resulting in the cell death of Candida clinical isolates. Eventually, the compound at sub-MIC (0.0125% v/v) significantly inhibited serum-induced germ tube formation by C. albicans. Eugenyl acetate inhibited biofilm forming ability of the organisms as well as reduced the adherence of Candida cells to HaCaT keratinocytes cells. In addition, upon treatment with EA, the phagocytic activity of macrophages was increased significantly against C. albicans (P < 0.05). The results demonstrated the potential of EA as a valuable phytochemical to fight against emerging Candida infections.

KEYWORDS:

Biofilm formation; Candida albicans; Candida glabrata; Candida parapsilosis; Candida tropicalis; Cell damage; Eugenyl acetate; Phagocytic activity; antifungal activity

PMID:
27452957
DOI:
10.1016/j.micpath.2016.07.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center