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Eur J Neurosci. 2016 Sep;44(6):2387-95. doi: 10.1111/ejn.13344. Epub 2016 Aug 18.

Spatially resolved time-frequency analysis of odour coding in the insect antennal lobe.

Author information

1
Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, Piazza Manifattura 1, 38068, Rovereto, Italy. marco.paoli@unitn.it.
2
Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, Piazza Manifattura 1, 38068, Rovereto, Italy.
3
Division of Physiological Psychology, Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.
4
Department of Physics, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.
5
Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, Piazza Manifattura 1, 38068, Rovereto, Italy. albrecht.haase@unitn.it.
6
Department of Physics, University of Trento, Trento, Italy. albrecht.haase@unitn.it.

Abstract

Antennal lobes constitute the first neurophils in the insect brain involved in coding and processing of olfactory information. With their stereotyped functional and anatomical organization, they provide an accessible model with which to investigate information processing of an external stimulus in a neural network in vivo. Here, by combining functional calcium imaging with time-frequency analysis, we have been able to monitor the oscillatory components of neural activity upon olfactory stimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of stimulus-induced oscillatory patterns in the honeybee antennal lobe, and to analyse the distribution of those patterns across the antennal lobe glomeruli. Fast two-photon calcium imaging reveals the presence of low-frequency oscillations, the intensity of which is perturbed by an incoming stimulus. Moreover, analysis of the spatial arrangement of this activity indicates that it is not homogeneous throughout the antennal lobe. On the contrary, each glomerulus displays an odorant-specific time-frequency profile, and acts as a functional unit of the oscillatory activity. The presented approach allows simultaneous recording of complex activity patterns across several nodes of the antennal lobe, providing the means to better understand the network dynamics regulating olfactory coding and leading to perception.

KEYWORDS:

honeybee; sensory coding; time-frequency analysis; two-photon microscopy

PMID:
27452956
DOI:
10.1111/ejn.13344
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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