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J Infect Chemother. 2016 Sep;22(9):581-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2016.06.010. Epub 2016 Jul 21.

Nationwide surveillance of the antimicrobial susceptibility of Chlamydia trachomatis from male urethritis in Japan.

Author information

1
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID) and The Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Infection Control and Laboratory Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. Electronic address: stakahas@sapmed.ac.jp.
2
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID) and The Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan.
3
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID) and The Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu, Japan.
4
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID) and The Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan.
5
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID) and The Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Blood Purification Center, Kagoshima University Hospital, Kagoshima, Japan.
6
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID) and The Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.
7
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID) and The Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan.
8
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID) and The Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan.
9
The Surveillance Committee of JSC, JAID and JSCM, Tokyo, Japan.
10
Infection Control Research Center, Kitasato University, Tokyo, Japan.
11
Department of Urology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
12
Department of Urology, The Jikei University Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.
13
Department of Urology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
14
Division of Urology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan.
15
Department of Urology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.
16
Department of Urology, Hiroshima University Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima, Japan.
17
University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan.
18
Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
19
Ito Urology Clinic, Kitakyushu, Japan.
20
Hosobe Clinic, Tokyo, Japan.
21
Hirayama Urology Clinic, Kumamoto, Japan.
22
Narita Clinic, Nagoya, Japan.
23
Yamaguchi Dermatology and Urology Clinic, Munakata, Japan.
24
iClinic, Sendai, Japan.
25
Sumii Clinic, Hiroshima, Japan.
26
Kawai Urology Clinic, Kitakyushu, Japan.
27
Kanokogi Clinic, Nishinomiya, Japan.
28
Kawano Clinic, Fukuoka, Japan.
29
Chokyu Tenma Clinic, Himeji, Japan.
30
Hirajima Clinic, Okayama, Japan.
31
Araki Urological Clinic, Kurashiki, Japan.
32
Kaji Clinic, Fukuoka, Japan.
33
Kawahara Urology Clinic, Kagoshima, Japan.
34
Department of Urology, Takayama Hospital, Chikushino, Japan.
35
Gifu Urological Clinic, Gifu, Japan.
36
Yoshioka Urology Clinic, Nishinomiya, Japan.
37
Department of Urology, Kano Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.
38
Kadena Urological Clinic, Hiroshima, Japan.
39
Nishi Urology and Dermatology Clinic, Fukuoka, Japan.
40
Nishimura Urology Clinic, Kitakyushu, Japan.
41
Yamauchi Urological Clinic, Aichi, Japan.
42
Department of Urology, Toyota Memorial Hospital, Toyota, Japan.
43
Department of Urology, Daiyukai Daiichi Hospital, Ichinomiya, Japan.
44
Ihara Clinic, Kobe, Nishinomiya, Japan.
45
Matsumura Urology Clinic, Kato, Japan.
46
Shirane Urology Clinic, Aki-gun, Japan.
47
Department of Urology, National Hospital Organization Hakodate National Hospital, Hakodate, Japan.
48
Akiyama Urology Clinic, Nishinomiya, Japan.
49
Department of Urology, Fukuoka Shin Mizumaki Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.
50
Uenohara Clinic, Kitakyushu, Japan.
51
Munakata Suikokai General Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.
52
Yoh Urology and Dermatology Clinic, Inazawa, Japan.

Abstract

Genital chlamydial infection is a principal sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Chlamydia trachomatis can cause male urethritis, acute epididymitis, cervicitis, and pelvic inflammatory disease as sexually transmitted infections. Fortunately, homotypic resistant C. trachomatis strains have not been isolated to date; however, several studies have reported the isolation of heterotypic resistant strains from patients. In this surveillance study, clinical urethral discharge specimens were collected from patients with urethritis in 51 hospitals and clinics in 2009 and 38 in 2012. Based on serial cultures, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) could be determined for 19 isolates in 2009 and 39 in 2012. In 2009 and 2012, the MICs (MIC90) of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, tosufloxacin, sitafloxacin, doxycycline, minocycline, erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin were 2 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, 0.5 μg/ml and 0.5 μg/ml, 0.125 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, 0.063 μg/ml and 0.063 μg/ml, 0.125 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, 0.125 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, 0.016 μg/ml and 0.016 μg/ml, and 0.063 μg/ml and 0.063 μg/ml, respectively. In summary, this surveillance project did not identify any resistant strain against fluoroquinolone, tetracycline, or macrolide agents in Japan.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial susceptibility; Chlamydia trachomatis; Surveillance

PMID:
27452428
DOI:
10.1016/j.jiac.2016.06.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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