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Food Chem. 2016 Dec 15;213:169-179. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.06.033. Epub 2016 Jun 14.

Accuracy of a method based on atomic absorption spectrometry to determine inorganic arsenic in food: Outcome of the collaborative trial IMEP-41.

Author information

1
European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, 111 Retieseweg, 2440 Geel, Belgium.
2
Metal Contamination Laboratory (IATA-CSIC), Avd. Agustín Escardino 7, 46980 Paterna, Valencia, Spain.
3
Institute of Chemistry, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 1, 8010 Graz, Austria.
4
Technical University of Denmark, National Food Institute, Division of Food Chemistry, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, 2860 Søborg, Denmark.
5
Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Martí I Franque's 1-11, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.
6
Department of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità-Italian National Health Institute, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy.
7
Trace Element Speciation Laboratory (TESLA), University of Aberdeen, College of Physical Science, Chemistry, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE, Scotland, United Kingdom.
8
European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, 111 Retieseweg, 2440 Geel, Belgium. Electronic address: Maria.de-la-calle@ec.europa.eu.

Abstract

A collaborative trial was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of an analytical method for the quantification of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in food. The method is based on (i) solubilisation of the protein matrix with concentrated hydrochloric acid to denature proteins and allow the release of all arsenic species into solution, and (ii) subsequent extraction of the inorganic arsenic present in the acid medium using chloroform followed by back-extraction to acidic medium. The final detection and quantification is done by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HG-AAS). The seven test items used in this exercise were reference materials covering a broad range of matrices: mussels, cabbage, seaweed (hijiki), fish protein, rice, wheat, mushrooms, with concentrations ranging from 0.074 to 7.55mgkg(-1). The relative standard deviation for repeatability (RSDr) ranged from 4.1 to 10.3%, while the relative standard deviation for reproducibility (RSDR) ranged from 6.1 to 22.8%.

KEYWORDS:

Algae; Cereals; Collaborative trial; Fish; Inorganic arsenic; Mushrooms; Mussels; Vegetables

PMID:
27451169
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.06.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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