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Brain Imaging Behav. 2017 Aug;11(4):1018-1028. doi: 10.1007/s11682-016-9575-9.

The relationship between repetition suppression and face perception.

Author information

1
Brain Imaging Centre, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudósok körútja 2, Budapest, 1117, Hungary. hermann.petra@ttk.mta.hu.
2
Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest, Hungary. hermann.petra@ttk.mta.hu.
3
Institute of Psychology, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Jena, Germany.
4
DFG Research Unit Person Perception, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Jena, Germany.
5
Department of Cognitive Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary.
6
Brain Imaging Centre, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudósok körútja 2, Budapest, 1117, Hungary.

Abstract

Repetition of identical face stimuli leads to fMRI response attenuation (fMRI adaptation, fMRIa) in the core face-selective occipito-temporal visual cortical network, involving the bilateral fusiform face area (FFA) and the occipital face area (OFA). However, the functional relevance of fMRIa observed in these regions is unclear as of today. Therefore, here we aimed at investigating the relationship between fMRIa and face perception ability by measuring in the same human participants both the repetition-induced reduction of fMRI responses and identity discrimination performance outside the scanner for upright and inverted face stimuli. In the correlation analysis, the behavioral and fMRI results for the inverted faces were used as covariates to control for the individual differences in overall object perception ability and basic visual feature adaptation processes, respectively. The results revealed a significant positive correlation between the participants' identity discrimination performance and the strength of fMRIa in the core face processing network, but not in the extrastriate body area (EBA). Furthermore, we found a strong correlation of the fMRIa between OFA and FFA and also between OFA and EBA, but not between FFA and EBA. These findings suggest that there is a face-selective component of the repetition-induced reduction of fMRI responses within the core face processing network, which reflects functionally relevant adaptation processes involved in face identity perception.

KEYWORDS:

FFA; Face discrimination; OFA; Repetition suppression; fMRI adaptation

PMID:
27450379
DOI:
10.1007/s11682-016-9575-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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