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Cancer Epidemiol. 2016 Oct;44:1-4. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2016.07.003. Epub 2016 Jul 21.

Common variants in the obesity-associated genes FTO and MC4R are not associated with risk of colorectal cancer.

Author information

1
Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
2
Department of Medicine and Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
4
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
5
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
6
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
7
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
8
Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany; Division of Preventive Oncology and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
9
Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
10
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
11
Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
12
Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Canada; Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
13
Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, USA.
14
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
15
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
16
Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: Peter.Campbell@cancer.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity is a convincing risk factor for colorectal cancer. Genetic variants in or near FTO and MC4R are consistently associated with body mass index and other body size measures, but whether they are also associated with colorectal cancer risk is unclear.

METHODS:

In the discovery stage, we tested associations of 677 FTO and 323 MC4R single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) 100kb upstream and 300kb downstream from each respective locus with risk of colorectal cancer in data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR: 1960 cases; 1777 controls). Next, all SNPs that were nominally statistically significant (p<0.05) in the discovery stage were included in replication analyses in data from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO: 9716 cases; 9844 controls).

RESULTS:

In the discovery stage, 43 FTO variants and 18 MC4R variants were associated with colorectal cancer risk (p<0.05). No SNPs remained statistically significant in the replication analysis after accounting for multiple comparisons.

CONCLUSION:

We found no evidence that individual variants in or near the obesity-related genes FTO and MC4R are associated with risk of colorectal cancer.

KEYWORDS:

Case-control study; Colorectal cancer; Genetic variants; Obesity

PMID:
27449576
PMCID:
PMC5125024
DOI:
10.1016/j.canep.2016.07.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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