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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jul 19;13(7). pii: E725. doi: 10.3390/ijerph13070725.

A Survey of Jellyfish Sting Knowledge among Naval Personnel in Northeast China.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Nursing, School of Nursing, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. ting.kan@smmu.edu.cn.
2
Department of Emergency Nursing, School of Nursing, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. guili2000@foxmail.com.
3
Department of Emergency Nursing, School of Nursing, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. xiaowenz@126.com.
4
Department of Emergency Nursing, School of Nursing, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. yan8811@hotmail.com.
5
Department of Emergency Nursing, School of Nursing, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. shiny0820@foxmail.com.
6
Department of Emergency Nursing, School of Nursing, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. qiuchenqiuying@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Jellyfish envenomation is common along the coastal area, and can cause severe consequences. Naval personnel are among the high-risk population for this injury. The aim of this study was to assess knowledge regarding jellyfish envenomation among naval personnel in a navy unit in northeast China.

METHODS:

A predesigned questionnaire was distributed to 120 naval members in January 2015. The data of 108 respondents were included in the statistical analysis.

RESULTS:

We found that 38.0% of the respondents selected jellyfish sting as the common wound in their units, and 13.0% had experienced or observed this injury. In addition, 63.0% of the participants rated their own knowledge as "low" or "none". The average score they got was 5.77 ± 2.50, with only 16.7% getting a score above 60% of the full score. The correct rates of five questions were below 60%. No statistical differences existed in the knowledge score among different groups of respondents defined by socio-demographic variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

Jellyfish sting is common in this navy unit, but personnel got a low score on the knowledge assessment. They also lacked confidence in first aid. Medical education and training should be implemented to address this issue.

KEYWORDS:

jellyfish sting; knowledge; medical education; naval personnel; occupational and environmental health

PMID:
27447652
PMCID:
PMC4962266
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph13070725
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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