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Can Respir J. 2016;2016:7947198. doi: 10.1155/2016/7947198. Epub 2016 Jun 8.

Sleep in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Evidence Gaps and Challenges.

Author information

1
Clinical Investigator Program, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1M9; Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Sleep Medicine Center, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100730, China.
3
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence is rising to epidemic proportions due to historical smoking trends, the aging of the population, and air pollution. Although blaming the victims has been common in COPD, the majority of COPD worldwide is now thought to be nonsmoking related, that is, caused by air pollution and cookstove exposure. It is increasingly appreciated that subjective and objective sleep disturbances are common in COPD, although strong epidemiological data are lacking. People with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) plus COPD (the so-called overlap syndrome) have a high risk of cardiovascular death, although again mechanisms are unknown and untested. This review aims to draw attention to the problem of sleep in COPD, to encourage clinicians to ask their patients about symptoms, and to stimulate further research in this area given the large burden of the disease.

PMID:
27445564
PMCID:
PMC4916278
DOI:
10.1155/2016/7947198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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