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Sci Rep. 2016 Jul 21;6:30028. doi: 10.1038/srep30028.

Antibiotic-induced perturbations in gut microbial diversity influences neuro-inflammation and amyloidosis in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.
2
The Microbiome Center, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Genetics and Aging Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02114, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, Hope Center for Neurological Disorders, Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.

Abstract

Severe amyloidosis and plaque-localized neuro-inflammation are key pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition to astrocyte and microglial reactivity, emerging evidence suggests a role of gut microbiota in regulating innate immunity and influencing brain function. Here, we examine the role of the host microbiome in regulating amyloidosis in the APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD. We show that prolonged shifts in gut microbial composition and diversity induced by long-term broad-spectrum combinatorial antibiotic treatment regime decreases Aβ plaque deposition. We also show that levels of soluble Aβ are elevated and that levels of circulating cytokine and chemokine signatures are altered in this setting. Finally, we observe attenuated plaque-localised glial reactivity in these mice and significantly altered microglial morphology. These findings suggest the gut microbiota community diversity can regulate host innate immunity mechanisms that impact Aβ amyloidosis.

PMID:
27443609
PMCID:
PMC4956742
DOI:
10.1038/srep30028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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