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Genome Res. 2016 Aug;26(8):1081-90. doi: 10.1101/gr.205948.116. Epub 2016 Jul 20.

Global deceleration of gene evolution following recent genome hybridizations in fungi.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032, Japan;
2
Japan Collection of Microorganisms, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0074, Japan;
3
Division of Genomic Technologies, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan;
4
Department of Microbiology, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588, Japan;
5
Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032, Japan; Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568, Japan; Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan.

Abstract

Polyploidization events such as whole-genome duplication and inter-species hybridization are major evolutionary forces that shape genomes. Although long-term effects of polyploidization have been well-characterized, early molecular evolutionary consequences of polyploidization remain largely unexplored. Here, we report the discovery of two recent and independent genome hybridizations within a single clade of a fungal genus, Trichosporon Comparative genomic analyses revealed that redundant genes are experiencing decelerations, not accelerations, of evolutionary rates. We identified a relationship between gene conversion and decelerated evolution suggesting that gene conversion may improve the genome stability of young hybrids by restricting gene functional divergences. Furthermore, we detected large-scale gene losses from transcriptional and translational machineries that indicate a global compensatory mechanism against increased gene dosages. Overall, our findings illustrate counteracting mechanisms during an early phase of post-genome hybridization and fill a critical gap in existing theories on genome evolution.

PMID:
27440871
PMCID:
PMC4971771
DOI:
10.1101/gr.205948.116
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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