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BMC Cancer. 2016 Jul 20;16:507. doi: 10.1186/s12885-016-2480-1.

Occult invasive cervical cancer after simple hysterectomy: a multi-center retrospective study of 89 cases.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Affiliated Hospital of Medical College Qingdao University, Qingdao, China.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China.
5
Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
6
Department of Pathology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital Affiliated China Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
7
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. shenkeng@vip.sina.com.
8
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. zhenyuzhang2000@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Occult invasive cervical cancer (OICC) is sometimes incidentally found in surgical specimens after a simple hysterectomy (SH). This study was aimed at identifying a subset of patients with OICC who have a favorable prognosis. This patient group may not require adjuvant radiotherapy and other procedures.

METHODS:

The medical records of women in whom OICC was detected after an inadvertent SH were retrospectively reviewed. The relevant data, including clinicopathological characteristics, treatment and clinical outcome were evaluated. The primary and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS), respectively.

RESULTS:

Eighty-nine patients who met the inclusion criteria were included for analysis, and the risk of OICC was found to be 1.9 %. Finding an invasive cancer in a hysterectomy specimen after a conization procedure that shows positive margins was the most common reason (41.6 %) for the performance of inadvertent SH. In the univariate analysis, a tumor width > 20 mm, deep stromal invasion, and lymph node metastasis (LNM) were adversely associated with relapse (P < 0.001, < 0.001, and = 0.001, respectively) and survival (P = 0.003, 0.004, and 0.027, respectively), although these parameters were not independently associated with patient prognoses in the multivariate analysis. In patients with a tumor width ≤ 20 mm and superficial stromal invasion in the observation subgroup, the 5-year RFS and 5-year OS were both 100 %, whereas they were 57.1 % and 66.7 %, respectively, in patients with a tumor size > 20 mm and deep stromal invasion in the radiotherapy or chemotherapy subgroup (P < 0.001, and = 0.008, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Simple observation after a lymphadenectomy procedure may be feasible in OICC patients with a tumor width ≤ 20 mm, superficial stromal invasion, a negative section margin in hysterectomy specimens, and no LNM.

KEYWORDS:

Adjuvant treatment; Cervical cancer; Inadvertent hysterectomy; OICC; Simple observation

PMID:
27439407
PMCID:
PMC4955116
DOI:
10.1186/s12885-016-2480-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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